Toyota’s LC300 breaks cover

After months of teasing, Toyota South Africa Motors has finally gone public with a few more key details about the Land Cruiser 200 New Generation, to be known as the LC300.

First off, it will run on an all-new TNGA-F platform, short for Toyota New Global Architecture, with the “F” for a wide spectrum of body-on-frame models.

The familiar silhouette and dimensions of the LC200 remain, in order, says Toyota, to retain the vehicle’s off-road abilities. Major changes include new engines, a suite of advanced safety features, and significant revisions to interior and exterior styling.

To signal the dropping of the 4.5-litre V8 diesel from the local line-up, the previous generation GX grade and premium VX-R grade will be replaced by three new derivatives: a flashy new ZX trim level and identity, plus the more off-road worthy baseline GX-R and the flagship GR-S.

Two new V6 engines promise better performance, lower emissions and superior fuel economy compared to the outgoing 195kW/650Nm 4.5-litre diesel V8. Coupled to a new 10-speed automatic transmission will be either a 3.3-litre diesel with 225kW and 700Nm (from 1600rpm), or a 3.5-litre petrol with 305kW and 650Nm.

The 2850mm wheelbase is carried over, along with the ground clearance of 312mm, 32 degree approach angle and 26.5 degree departure angle. Lengths vary, with the longest ZX at 4985mm, the GR-S at 4965 and the GX-R at 4950. The GR-S at 1990mm is also a marginal 10mm wider than the others. All feature 80+30 litres fuel tank capacity, lower than the 93+45 of the previous gen.

Incidentally the new line-up will carry a 130kg lower GVM than before, weighing in at 3230kg, though towing capacity at 3500kg (braked) remains unchanged. Elements such as an aluminium roof have helped with the weight loss programme. All derivatives will also feature seating for seven, including the lower GX-R.

New grilles define the LC300, with the halo GR-S getting a honeycomb and Toyota name in full, while the GX-R and ZX get the standard marque badge and horizontal slats. The rear bumpers are also significantly tweaked.

The GR-S is the model of choice for off-road excursions, offered with 18-inch wheels, front and rear diff locks, and Toyota’s electronic KDSS (Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System), which allows for automatic freeing and locking of front and rear suspension stabilisers – and so more or less suspension movement as the terrain demands.

By contrast, the ZX runs on 20-inch wheels, has standard coil springs instead of the E-KDSS and swaps the diff locks for a torque-sensing Limited Slip Differential.  On the amenities side, it shares a 14-speaker JBL sound system with the GR-S, plus a head-up display and 12.3-inch display panel through which to engage features such as the Panoramic View and Multi Terrain monitors. Safety add-ons for both these top models include Adaptive Cruise Control, a Lane Departure alert, Parking Sensors and a sophisticated Pre-Collision system.

The GX-R is more stripped-down, but more generously equipped than the current NATO-spec GX. It loses the snorkel but gets a rear diff lock, coil springs, fewer of the 4WD driver aids apart from parking sensors and makes do with a lowly four-speaker sound system and 7-inch touch screen. No bad thing considering the price savings to expect.

After months of teasing, Toyota South Africa Motors has finally gone public with a few more key details about the Land Cruiser 200 New Generation, to be known as the LC300.

First off, it will run on an all-new TNGA-F platform, short for Toyota New Global Architecture, with the “F” for a wide spectrum of body-on-frame models.

The familiar silhouette and dimensions of the LC200 remain, in order, says Toyota, to retain the vehicle’s off-road abilities. Major changes include new engines, a suite of advanced safety features, and significant revisions to interior and exterior styling.

To signal the dropping of the 4.5-litre V8 diesel from the local line-up, the previous generation GX grade and premium VX-R grade will be replaced by three new derivatives: a flashy new ZX trim level and identity, plus the more off-road worthy baseline GX-R and the flagship GR-S.

Two new V6 engines promise better performance, lower emissions and superior fuel economy compared to the outgoing 195kW/650Nm 4.5-litre diesel V8. Coupled to a new 10-speed automatic transmission will be either a 3.3-litre diesel with 225kW and 700Nm (from 1600rpm), or a 3.5-litre petrol with 305kW and 650Nm.

The 2850mm wheelbase is carried over, along with the ground clearance of 312mm, 32 degree approach angle and 26.5 degree departure angle. Lengths vary, with the longest ZX at 4985mm, the GR-S at 4965mm and the GX-R at 4950m . The GR-S at 1990mm is also a marginal 10mm wider than the others. All feature 80+30 litres fuel tank capacity, lower than the 93+45 of the previous gen.

Incidentally the new line-up will carry a 130kg lower GVM than before, weighing in at 3230kg, though towing capacity at 3500kg (braked) remains unchanged. Elements such as an aluminium roof have helped with the weight loss programme. All derivatives will also feature seating for seven, including the lower GX-R.

New grilles define the LC300, with the halo GR-S getting a honeycomb and Toyota name in full, while the GX-R and ZX get the standard marque badge and horizontal slats. The rear bumpers are also significantly tweaked.

The GR-S is the model of choice for off-road excursions, offered with 18-inch wheels, front and rear diff locks, and Toyota’s electronic KDSS (Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System), which allows for automatic freeing and locking of front and rear suspension stabilisers – and so more or less suspension movement as the terrain demands.

By contrast, the ZX runs on 20-inch wheels, has standard coil springs instead of the E-KDSS and swaps the diff locks for a torque-sensing Limited Slip Differential.  On the amenities side, it shares a 14-speaker JBL sound system with the GR-S, plus a head-up display and 12.3-inch display panel through which to engage features such as the Panoramic View and Multi Terrain monitors. Safety add-ons for both these top models include Adaptive Cruise Control, a Lane Departure alert, Parking Sensors and a sophisticated Pre-Collision system.

The GX-R is more stripped-down, but more generously equipped than the current NATO-spec GX. It loses the snorkel but gets a rear diff lock, coil springs, fewer of the 4WD driver aids apart from parking sensors and makes do with a lowly four-speaker sound system and 7-inch touch screen. No bad thing considering the price savings to expect.

Has Toyota simply polished a classic formula? Seems like it and most enthusiasts will applaud. The bad news? Only the petrol-engined ZX grade will be available from July, with the balance of the petrol and diesel derivatives to land in dealerships from September.

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