Test all limits in the Nissan Navara
Test all limits in the Nissan Navara

Is the previous generation Raptor a good buy?

The previous generation Ford Ranger Raptor new sold for R956 300 in 2022 and the launch price was R786 400. We delve into whether it is still a good buy today. But before we start, here are the basic specs of the 2019-2022 Raptor.

Model: Ford Ranger Raptor 2,0 Bi Turbo 10AT 4×4

  • Priced from: R550 000 to R850 000
  • Engine: 2,0-litre, bi-turbodiesel four-cylinder
  • Power: 157kW at 3 750r/min
  • Torque: 500Nm between 1 500r/min and 2 000r/min
  • 0-100km/h: 10,5 seconds
  • Top speed: 170 km/h
  • Fuel Consumption: 8,3 litres/100km
  • CO2: 220g/km
  • Transmission: 10-speed automatic
  • Warranty: 3-year/100 000km
  • Service plan: 6-year/90 000km

It was available in four colours; Artic White (at no extra cost) and Conquer Grey, Shadow Black and Ford Performance Blue options, which would have added another R1 260 to your bill. Fortunately, that extra cost doesn’t trickle down to the second-hand buyer.

There were two model variants – the Standard Ranger Raptor and the Raptor Special Edition or SE. The SE had a few extras, including a roll bar, a manual roller and striking decals that made it look more aggressive than its lesser sibling.

The previous-generation Raptor was a fun drive, nothing crazy but it was able to handle gravel roads with ease, thanks to the Fox suspension. However, it lacks the safety and tech features you would find in the Ranger Wildtrak and Thunder.

The biggest difference, of course, is the Raptor’s chassis and suspension. The conventional ladder frame chassis starts as a normal Ford Ranger chassis in the front end, but as soon as you move to the rear, you’ll find that it has the Everest-like architecture. This means that, unlike the Ranger’s leaf spring layout, the Raptor has Fox Racing coil-overs on all four corners. This translates to a 150mm wider wheel track and improved suspension travel with 32% in front and 22% at the rear.

The Raptor came of the dealer floor with 285/70- R17 BF Goodrich Ko2’s. Later in 2021 these were swapped for the General Grabber AT3’s also 285/70 R17’s. Both brands, coupled with the Fox suspension, means it towers above just about everything else on the road and boasts 283mm of ground clearance. This, of course, translates into better approach, departure and hangover angles. A superb, capable off-roader then! But those big tires did come at a cost…

Ford claimed fuel consumption figures of 8.2 litres/100km on the open road and 9.4 litres/100km around town. We managed 10.7 litres/100km and 11.2 litres/100km, respectively, but seeing that you’re driving a racing bakkie, your foot might be a bit heavier.

Driving this beauty to Limpopo was a sheer pleasure since the pothole-littered roads had zero impact, and we did not even feel we had to slow down. Around town, the aggressive design and F150-inspired grille means it grabs a lot of attention, although a lot of its head-turning power is lost when compared to its successor. As for gravel travel, it is what you’d expect: firmly planted and comfortable, and it’s clear this bakkie was made for this.

However, this bakkie is not perfect, and there is that one niggle… In this case, the engine. There is nothing wrong with the 2.0 Bi-turbo. It puts out a good amount of power without being too thirsty. Obviously, this is the sensible engine option, but why would you want sensible in a racing bakkie? It’s a little like buying a 2.3-litre Mustang even though you can afford the 5-litre! And I presume that is the reason why the next gen Raptor is a bit bat crazy and just a whole lot of fun to drive!

In my opinion this Raptor wasn’t built for the overlander. Going up a rocky mountain, kicking up sand in the dunes or travelling 140km/h on a gravel road its perfect. And you can drive it off the dealer floor straight on to a 4×4 course and have loads of fun. The load capacity is a bit on the low side but if you want to tow a trailer or off-road caravan you wouldn’t need the load capacity as most of your gear can be distributed between whatever you’re towing and the vehicle itself. So, there are ways around it if you wish to go overlanding.

One of the things that irked me the most was the fake engine noise that is played through the speakers in the cabin. If you aren’t a big petrol head you would have probably just accepted that the 2.0l Bi-turbo diesel engine can sound like a monster V6, or you might just not care.

What do they sell for now second-hand?

When Ford announced the Ranger Raptor in May of 2019 the recommended selling price was R786 400. And the Ranger Raptor SE R956 300 in Oct 2021.

A quick search on one of the car sale websites gave us a good idea of what you might be paying for a used Raptor. Although there are loads of factors that influence the price for example mileage, year model and in some instances extras, you should expect to pay anything from R550 000 to around R850 000 for a 2022 model with less than 50 000km.

So, if you in the market for a good second-hand bakkie that handles gravel brilliantly and you are not planning on loading a tonne in the bin, then this is the vehicle for you. The previous-gen Raptor is still a great buy, and the current Ranger is still fitted with the same diesel burner under the hood.

Most expensive:

2022 Ford Ranger 2.0Bi-Turbo Double Cab 4×4 Raptor Special Edition

  • Mileage: 37 000km
  • Warranty valid up to 100 000km or the remainder of the 3-year warranty.
  • Service plan valid to 90 000km or the remainder of the 6-year service plan.
  • Extras: Steel canopy included
  • Price: R849 900
  • Monthly repayment: R15 659 calculated with a 10% deposit and over 72 months

The middle:

2020 Ford Ranger 2.0Bi-Turbo Double Cab 4×4 Raptor

  • Mileage: 85 000km
  • Warranty valid up to 100 000km or the remainder of the 3-year warranty.
  • Service plan valid to 90 000km or the remainder of the 6-year service plan.
  • Extras: Steel canopy included
  • Price: R649 900
  • Monthly repayment: R11 790 calculated with a 10% deposit and over 72 months

Most affordable:

2019 Ford Ranger 2.0Bi-Turbo Double Cab 4×4 Raptor

  • Mileage: 133 500km
  • Warranty: Expired
  • Service plan: Expired
  • Extras: Roll bar and nudge bar
  • Price: R549 990
  • Monthly repayment: R10 190 calculated with a 10% deposit and over 72 months

Is the previous gen Raptor still a good buy?

The answer to that question is a resounding yes! This is the type of bakkie that, if you want to travel off-road, you won’t need an upgraded suspension or different tyres… Unless, of course, the previous owner didn’t decide to pop 20-inch wheels and rubber bands for tyres on it! The Raptor still looks good and drives very well. It does lack some safety features and bells and whistles, but are those really necessary?

The first-gen Raptor remains a special vehicle and still loads of fun to drive, parts are widely available. However, there are some niggles to look out for and one of the biggest was the gearbox. Once it develops a gearbox issue, the problems keep coming. So, before you purchase a previous-gen Raptor, check the history of the vehicle at your local Ford dealer.

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